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Youth
 
Pride Committee Takes On Saskatchewan Government
 

IN the wake of repeated Saskatchewan Pride Day proclamation refusals this year by the Saskatchewan government the Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Pride Committee of Regina, on behalf of organizations across the province, has taken action.

According to the Pride Committee, initial refusal came in a letter from the New Democrat government's Executive Council dated June 2nd, 2000 with the reason for denial stated as:  "Proclamation from the Government of Saskatchewan is intended to recognize activities that benefit all Saskatchewan people."

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The Pride Committee responded to the letter with the clarification that the day is indeed a province-wide celebration and asked the province to reconsider.

The matter was reportedly brought up in the Saskatchewan government caucus on June 12th.  The party inner circle's final decision was to not grant the proclamation.

According to the Pride Committee, representatives told them that such decisions were at the government's discretion.

The refusal comes at an historic time for Pride in the prairie province.  This year the June 24th Saskatchewan Pride Parade in Regina will see people from across the province gather in the Queen City to celebrate.

Rather than accept the rejection the Pride Committee has decided to fight.

"After exhausting all avenues to work with the province to have the decision reversed, the Pride Committee filed a complaint of discrimination against the province with the Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission on June 13th," announced the LBG Pride Committee of Regina today in a statement.

The Pride Committee's position is that the refusal is in direct contradiction with amendments to the Saskatchewan Human Rights Code made in 1993 by the same government.